Heart and Vascular

Heart and Vascular Center

 

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Heart Failure Clinic

Theresa Garris with patient

Patients in the Advanced Heart Failure Program at the UT Heart and Vascular Center receive innovative, multidisciplinary treatment of their heart failure. 

Our experts in cardiology, electrophysiology, cardiac intervention and cardiac imaging provide patients with the most current, comprehensive and personalized treatment available. Patients also are offered specialized services such as the Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) and palliative care management, if needed.

What is Heart Failure?

Heart failure is a very common disease sometimes referred to as left ventricular dysfunction or congestive heart failure (CHF). It results from heart muscle weakness. The changes that occur lead to symptoms of fluid retention, shortness of breath and fatigue, especially on exertion.

The main pumping chamber of the heart is the left ventricle. Each beat pumps blood to your body, but perhaps not as well as it once did. When the body does not receive as much oxygen-rich blood, you may notice changes in how you feel.

Sometimes heart failure is mild and does not limit your activity. At other times, things that were once easy, like carrying groceries or climbing stairs may now be difficult. Your symptoms will depend on the nature and degree of your condition.

There are two types of heart failure. Systolic heart failure (weak heart) is when the main pumping chamber of the heart dilates, and diastolic heart failure (stiff heart) makes it hard to fill the heart and pump the blood out to the body. Also, the right heart can fail.

Congestive heart failure occurs when the body and lungs are congested and have too much extra fluid. Congestive heart failure can occur in both systolic and diastolic heart failure.

Symptoms of Heart Failure:

  • Weakness
  • Tiredness
  • Shortness of breath when walking
  • Shortness of breath at rest
  • Dizziness
  • Fainting
  • Swollen feet or ankles
  • Weight gain of 2-3 pounds in 24 hours

Take control of your future. If you are experiencing any of the above symptoms contact our Heart Failure specialists at 419.383.3963.


UT's Heart Failure Program in the News

WTOL 11, Feb. 2016

Dr. Mark Bonnell saved the life of 32-year-old Stacy Rollins by implanting a battery-powered blood pump inside her chest to take over for her failing heart.

UT News, Feb. 18, 2016
32-YEAR-OLD WOMAN RECEIVES HEART PUMP IMPLANT AT UTMC

Ohio Magazine, Feb. 2016
BEATING THE ODDS

UT News, Oct. 30, 2015
UTMC HONORED FOR HEART TREATMENT EFFORTS

UT News, Dec. 16, 2011
UTMC HEART PROCEDURE NEW TO NW OHIO GETS LOCAL MAN HOME FOR HOLIDAYS

 

Last Updated: 5/24/17